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Eat Your Words: Allegory and Stuffing

Eat Your Words: Allegory and Stuffing

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great--but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we bring you literary devices and culinary terms everyone should know. Paper

Allegory (noun): the use of a concrete object or symbol to portray an abstract concept, frequently a moral message.

Example: Aesop’s fables are among the most accessible literary allegories. The stories use characters--such as the tortoise and the hare--to teach children lessons of good behavior. A more sophisticated allegory can be found in George Orwell’s Animal Farm, in which the titular characters stand in for Stalin’s pre-WWII regime (some would say that something similar goes on in Yann Martel's Life of Pi).

Plates

Stuffing (noun): a mixture of seasoned, chopped ingredients—frequently including bread—filled into an empty cavity of meat or a vegetable before cooking.

Example: In her stuffed mushrooms recipe, Caryn Wille fills hollowed out Portabellos with wild rice stuffing. It's the French bread that makes this mixture most resemble a traditional stuffing, but the use of pecans and wild rice give it great texture and prevent it from turning mushy.

Wild rice stuffing

Sources: Dictionary.com | Buzzle.com | The Free Dictionary


Book Recommendation: The Lover's Dictionary by David Levithan

Book Recommendation: The Lover's Dictionary by David Levithan

Inspired Recipe: Stuffed Mushrooms with Wild Rice Stuffing

Inspired Recipe: Stuffed Mushrooms with Wild Rice Stuffing