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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Alliteration and Glaze

Eat Your Words: Alliteration and Glaze

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great--but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we bring you literary devices and culinary terms everyone should know.

Paper

Alliteration (noun): the use of repeating similar letter sounds to begin all the words in a small group.

Example: In Laura Lamont's Life in Pictures, the protagonist has two names that are both alliterative. Born Elsa Emerson, she later changes her name to Laura Lamont. This demonstrates that alliteration can be achieved with consonants or vowels. "Katie Carpenter kicked cans" would also be an alliterative phrase since the words' starting sounds are the same, even though the letters are not.

Plates

Glaze (verb): to apply a glossy coating to food while cooking; to cook a food in water, butter, and sugar

Example: To accompany her champagne cake, Caryn created a scrumptious cherry glaze that was so called because she cooked the cherries down in a mixture of sugar, water, and brandy. Adding a little cornstarch allowed the mixture to thicken. Overall, the reason this is a glaze and not a compote is that the cherries retained their natural shape and overall composition. Contrast this to our raspberry compote, in which the fruit were completely broken down in the cooking process, to the point that they reached a jam-like consistency. In this case, however, the cooked cherries simply took on a beautiful, shiny coating.

Champagne cake

Sources: Literary Devices | Cuisine-French.com


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Giveaway! Laura Lamont's Life In Pictures by Emma Straub

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