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Eat Your Words: Historical Fiction and Rise

Eat Your Words: Historical Fiction and Rise

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great -- but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we bring you literary devices and culinary terms everyone should know.

Paper

Historical Fiction (noun): a type of story that takes place in the past and whose narrative attempts to recreate people and events from history.

Example: Angie says her recommended read this week, Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore, isn't exactly a work of historical fiction, even though its plot kicks off with the murder of iconic painter Vincent Van Gogh who was, of course, a real person. How Van Gogh actually died is a contested fact; the popular belief is that he took his own life, but a book that came out last year says he died in a shooting accident. Though Sacré Bleu may not be a perfect example of historical fiction, there are many more popular novels that are. Some titles you may recognize are: The Help, by Kathryn Stockett; Gone With the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell; Number the Stars, by Lois Lowry; A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens; and All Quiet on the Western Front, by Erich Maria Remarque.

Plates

Rise (verb): leaving dough made with yeast to rest in a warm place, allowing it to double in size.

Example: In her French baguette recipe, Angie formed her dough in a food processor and let it sit for an hour at room temperature (first rise) before forming it into baguette shapes and allowing it to rise a second time before sticking it in the oven to bake. According to Bon Appétitthe first rise allows the yeast to ferment by feeding on sugars. The process takes 1 to 1-1/2 hours and you'll know it's done when you poke the dough with two fingers and it holds the indentation. The second rise takes place after the dough is formed, in this case into baguettes, and again allowed to rise to double its size. You can test for doneness using the two-finger poke method again. At that point, your bread is ready to bake. Bon appétit!

See past Eat Your Words installments here.

Sources: Dictionary.com | Good Cooking


Get Away: Montmartre, Paris, France

Get Away: Montmartre, Paris, France

Inspired Recipe: French Baguette

Inspired Recipe: French Baguette