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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Sequel and Mash

Eat Your Words: Sequel and Mash

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great–but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Sequel (noun): a story that stands complete on its own, but carries on the narrative of a previous work.

Example: Tana French's series of Dublin Murder Squad books is a set of four, with every new novel serving as a sequel of the ones that precede. Caryn says, "Each book follows a different detective on the squad, sometimes characters that played major roles in previous books, and sometimes side characters you breezed past in your frenzy to get to the end."

Mash (verb): to crush a soft food until it reaches an even texture.

Example: In her rosemary smashed potatoes recipe, Caryn bakes her baby red potatoes to soft perfection before mashing them up with a fork. The official definition of "mash" refers to the mashed potatoes we're used to – creamy, soft and evenly textured. Caryn's creative recipe, though, stops short of turning the potatoes to paste. Instead, she breaks down the tubers just enough to change their form while still retaining a chunky texture.

Rosemary smashed potatoes close up
Rosemary smashed potatoes close up

See past installments and learn more words by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Literary Terms and DefinitionsFood Network

Weather Or Not

Weather Or Not

Inspired Recipe: Rosemary Smashed Potatoes

Inspired Recipe: Rosemary Smashed Potatoes