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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Ode and Pressure-Cooked

Eat Your Words: Ode and Pressure-Cooked

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great–but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Ode (noun): formally, a lyric poem, intended to be sung, which exalts its subject. Also, a poem or work written to honor a specific person or concept.

Example: According to Kate Bernot, Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore is a sort of ode to reading. She describes it as a book for book lovers, with reading treated by author Robin Sloan with near-religious reverence. Other famous odes include Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" and John Keats' "Ode to Autumn."

Pressure-cooked (adjective): food cooked at a high temperature in a sealed metal pot.

Example: In her pressure-cooker steel-cut oats recipe, Kate uses the steam built up in her electric pressure-cooker to cook her oats in just five minutes. The benefits of pressure-cooking are the quickness of preparing meals (often in one-third the normal time) and, as such, the relatively lower loss of vitamins and minerals in the cooking process.

See past installments and learn more words by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Merriam-Webster | The Free Dictionary | Food Network

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