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Eat Your Words: Eponymous and Frosting

Eat Your Words: Eponymous and Frosting

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great – but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Eponymous (adjective): referring to a person, the one for whom a work is named; referring to a work, the one that is named for a central character or figure.

Example: Though Vampires in the Lemon Grove is a collection of short stories, Amy Cavanaugh makes clear that at least one of them is eponymous in nature. She refers to it as the book's "title story," indicating that it is the piece for which the entire volume is named. Other famous examples of eponymous works or characters are Jane Eyre, David Copperfieldand A Streetcar Named Desire. This last example demonstrates that eponyms are not always people; rather, they can also be features or objects that hold special value for the story.

Frosting (noun): "sweet glaze often made with sugar, butter, water and egg whites or milk, often flavored and cooked."

Example: Where I'm from, the sweet coating on a cake is called frosting and the glaze on a cookie is icing. As it turns out, though, the terms are actually interchangeable. In fact, frosting is just a type of icing. Be that as it may, frosting is almost always made with butter and sugar – like Amy's lemon frosting – while additions like water, egg whites and milk often also play a role.

See past installments by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: The Free Dictionary | POPSUGAR Food

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