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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Irony and Dough

Eat Your Words: Irony and Dough

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great – but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Irony (noun): in literature, a technique using development of character or plot to indicate a meaning that is in fact opposite to what is presented.

Example: In This Is How You Lose Herthe theme of masculine privilege is pervasive, manifesting itself as an ugly construct that serves to keep women down and hurt families. The book's protagonist, Yunior, is evidently oppressed by his father's power, but turns out to commit many of his same crimes, namely lust and infidelity. At once a victim and a perpetrator, Yunior's existence in the face of masculine privilege is clearly ironic.

Dough (noun): a paste of bread made from flour or meal combined with water, milk and the like, to be used for baking.

Example: Over the months, we have featured many doughs on PAPER/PLATES. The most recent example is for Mariam's stuffed bread, but you could also try Katie's tea biscuits, my scones, or Caryn's multi-grain sunflower loaves.

See past installments by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Dictionary.com | Dictionary.com

On Cooking Injuries

On Cooking Injuries

This Is How You Lose Her & Amani's Stuffed Bread

This Is How You Lose Her & Amani's Stuffed Bread