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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Short Novel and Floret

Eat Your Words: Short Novel and Floret

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Short Novel (noun): a book no longer than 80,000 words.

Example: Though everyone probably knows what a novel is, Laura's review of Kitchen this week raised the question of what defines a short novel. As you can see above, it's typically a word count. Some may think a page count would be more appropriate, but based on the myriad ways to lay out a book, pages can artificially define the length of said book. Rather, a word count is absolutely objective, and according to at least one source, the best way to decide whether a story fits this category.

Floret (noun): a miniscule flower, groups of which make up a larger head of a flower or edible plant.

Example: In plants such as cauliflower and broccoli, which is used in Laura's chicken divan, people eat the flowering portion. Clustered tightly, the florets are symmetrically placed divisions that together comprise a head. These are often separated for ease in cooking and eating.

See past installments by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Good Short Novels | Merriam-Webster

Stop The Movie, Gatsby. I Want to Get Off.

Stop The Movie, Gatsby. I Want to Get Off.

Kitchen & Mom's Chicken Divan

Kitchen & Mom's Chicken Divan