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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Metaphor and Muddle

Eat Your Words: Metaphor and Muddle

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Paper copy
Paper copy

Metaphor (noun): a figure of speech in which a word or phrase represents something other than itself, suggesting a similarity between the two.

Example: As Angie points out in her recommendation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel The Great Gatsbythat work is frequently used to teach high school students about metaphor. The text itself is rife with this literary device. Some of the most famous metaphors in that novel are the green light at the end of Daisy's dock, which Jay Gatsby yearns for when he can't have her; the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg, which watch over the most unsavory bits of the story, representing God; the Valley of Ashes, a wasteland of sorts between Long Island and New York City, where much tragedy occurs; and Gatsby's house itself, which symbolizes his desire to both be and be seen as wealthy.

Plates copy
Plates copy

Muddle (verb): to mash, mix or crush ingredients together.

Example: For Angie's Daisy Buchanan cocktail, you must muddle the cucumber slices with a pinch of salt. Using a muddler (similar to a wooden rod) or the handle of a large plastic spoon, pound down on the ingredients and twist. This will break them down while releasing their flavors and mixing them. This is best done in a sturdy glass.

Learn more words by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Free Dictionary | NovelGuide.com | Good Cocktails

My Week: May 18 - 24

My Week: May 18 - 24

The Great Gatsby & The Daisy Buchanan Cocktail

The Great Gatsby & The Daisy Buchanan Cocktail