Quantcast

Welcome.

PAPER/PLATES is a
literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Dog-Ear and Gazpacho

Eat Your Words: Dog-Ear and Gazpacho

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Dog-ear (verb): the turning of a corner of a page to serve as a book mark.

Example: When a reader dog-ears a book, it's probably one that she owns, one that she feels comfortable putting a somewhat permanent mark in. Books with dog-eared pages have usually been read many times, often by different people, who forego bookmarks in favor of simply turning the corner of a favorite page. The dog-eared page is an indicator of a well-read, well-loved book, and, in her recommendation this week, Caryn suggests Jessica Francis Kane's This Closeis a book deserving of such a treatment. For, you see, dog-earing is not simply for keeping one's place in a book, it's also something that reminds readers to refer back to specific pages and passages over and over again.

Gazpacho (noun): a chilled soup, traditionally made with chopped tomatoes, onions, cucumbers and herbs; from Spain

Example: Caryn's watermelon gazpacho is a take on the traditional Spanish dish. A traditional gazpacho, like this one, is savory, featuring bread, tomatoes, garlic, and vinegars. Caryn's version is a lighter take, perfect for summer. She does away with bread altogether and substitutes sweet and juicy fruits in place of the savory vegetables of the original. What makes it a gazpacho, still, is that it requires essentially no cooking and must be chilled before serving.

Learn more words by visiting our Eat Your Words archive!

Sources: Free Dictionary

TransAtlantic & Hasselback Potatoes

TransAtlantic & Hasselback Potatoes

This Close & Watermelon Gazpacho

This Close & Watermelon Gazpacho