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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Lyric and Hasselback Potato

Eat Your Words: Lyric and Hasselback Potato

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Lyric (adjective): writing that expresses strong emotions or spontaneous feelings.

Example: One of the words frequently used to describe author Colum McCann's writing is lyric. In my recommendation this week, I alluded to this quality, mentioning his ability to treat prose like poetry. McCann's words are at times like a song, strung together in unexpected ways, rhythmic in their cadence and responsible for the deeply emotional tone his books relay. This is evident in older novels such as Let the Great WorldSpin and his recent work, TransAtlantic.

Hasselback Potato (noun): a whole, roasted potato, sliced to resemble an accordion

Example: My Hasselback potatoes this week were inspired by a book set mostly in Ireland, but in fact they originated in Stockholm, Sweden. There, in a restaurant called Hasselbacken, they debuted in the 1940s and were called "hasselbackspotatis." Unlike other baked potatoes, the Hasselback variety are cut into 3-4 mm slices, but not all the way through. This leaves the slices connected at the bottom, keeping the whole potato together. The results is that the edges of the slices crisp up while the insides becomes soft and creamy.

Sources: Free Dictionary | WiseGEEK

Got It From My Mama: Habits

Got It From My Mama: Habits

TransAtlantic & Hasselback Potatoes

TransAtlantic & Hasselback Potatoes