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literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Allusion and Cut In

Eat Your Words: Allusion and Cut In

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Allusion (noun): a reference to a place, character or work that lacks explicit explanation of the connection.

Example: The best allusions are those that require little or no explanation, as when someone refers to "the road less traveled" or a catch-22. Chris Adrian's The Great Night is perhaps more heavy-handed in drawing its connection to William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, but every time the contemporary novel mentions Titania or Oberon without referring to their original appearance in the Bard's play, that count as an allusion.

Cut In (verb): to integrate shortening or butter into dry ingredients using a fork, knives or pastry cutter.

Example: In her recipe for blueberry scones,Mariam instructs us to cut butter into the mixture of dry ingredients. Once the butter pieces are the size of peas, that step is done. This process works well for pastry since the flour becomes coated in butter, creating a flaky texture by stopping gluten formation.

Source: Busy Cooks

Let's Discuss Odds Against Tomorrow by Nathaniel Rich

Let's Discuss Odds Against Tomorrow by Nathaniel Rich

Chris Adrian's The Great Night & Blueberry Scones

Chris Adrian's The Great Night & Blueberry Scones