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PAPER/PLATES is a
literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

Eat Your Words: Motif and Crumble

Eat Your Words: Motif and Crumble

Eat your words

Devouring books and crafting meals is great—but sounding smart while you do it is even better. That’s why we’re teaching you to eat your words. In this weekly guide, we introduce one literary device (PAPER) and one culinary term (PLATES) everyone should know.

Motif (noun): a subject or an element that is commonly found in a body of literature

Example: In her recommendation of Red Moon by BenjaminPercy, Caryn writes that "lycans" take the place of other vulnerable minorities in portraying famous struggles in the human past. This use of imaginary creatures can be interpreted as the motif of oppressed versus oppressor, where the lycans represent African-Americans in the Civil Rights movement, or the masses in the Occupy movement. Another common motif is the handsome prince rescuing the damsel in distress, which is present in many fairytales and, yes, Disney movies, too.

Crumble (verb): to use hands to break cooked food into small pieces.

Example: One of Americans' favorite toppings for everything from salads to desserts is bacon. To make it easier to eat and more an accompaniment than the focal point of the dish, people frequently sprinkle it, crumbled, over the top. Creating this is easy: Simply take crispy cooked bacon and use your fingers to break it into small pieces by crushing or tearing it to bits. Then, simply adorn your next salad with it.

Sources: Literary Devices

A Hologram for the King, or: Not Everything I Read is Good

A Hologram for the King, or: Not Everything I Read is Good

Here's That Spicy One-Pot Pasta Recipe You've All Been Asking For

Here's That Spicy One-Pot Pasta Recipe You've All Been Asking For