Quantcast

Welcome.

PAPER/PLATES is a
literary food blog, for readers with good taste.

An appetite for fashion

An appetite for fashion

Let's be real here — fashion is influenced by so many aspects of culture, even food. Here are some iconic, beautiful, and downright wacky ways that food and fashion have come together. 

Chanel Shopping Center

Who says you can't dress up to go to the market? Karl Lagerfeld made waves at the 2014/2015 Chanel Ready-to-Wear show when he staged it as a grocery store. Every girl gets groceries, even a fashionista... so the mundane, everyday errand became an epic fashion show, with real Chanel branded food, each an homage to original branding: Coco Flakes, Délices de Gabrielle, spirits named after each Metiers d'Arts collection, cleaning supplies covered in the famous Chanel chains, the list goes on. Needless to say, it caused an Instagram frenzy.

Coca-Cola sweatshirt. Image via Nordstrom.

Coca-Cola sweatshirt. Image via Nordstrom.

Marc Jacobs 'Arden Square' sweatshirt

In 2013, Marc Jacobs designed a sweatshirt with the brand's Arden Square shaded red logo, split by a white wave. If it reminds you of a popular American phenomenon, there's a reason for that! The designer had also recently partnered with Coca-Cola manufacturer on a limited-edition range of bottles with his design.

A photo posted by Adam Katz Sinding (@le21eme) on

Moschino fast food fashion

When American designer Jeremy Scott created his first collection for Italian fashion house Moschino, he designed couture in the vein of fast (no, not fashion!) food. Back in the day, Franco Moschino, once showed a dinner jacket buttoned with knives and forks. For his 21st Century take, Scott appropriated the McDonald's logo, including a rendering of those red and yellow uniforms we've come to know so well, and a handbag emblazoned with those all too familiar golden arches. M for Moschino, anyone? 

Lady Gaga's meat dress

Who can forget Lady Gaga's controversial meat dress from the 2010 VMAs? The dress, designed by Franc Fernandez and styled by Nicola Formichetti, now lives at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, where it has apparently taken on the texture of beef jerky. The best part is no one knows how long it will last. Maybe perishable fashion is the future? 

Designer Young-A Lee with SCOBY vest and shoe prototypes. Photo by Christopher Gannon.

Designer Young-A Lee with SCOBY vest and shoe prototypes. Photo by Christopher Gannon.

Fashionable leftovers

Speaking of perishable fashion, SCOBY is a line of clothing made of food waste, specifically from a byproduct of kombucha tea. Creator Young-A Lee is a professor of apparel, merchandising, and design at Iowa State University, and sees a viable future for clothing made from food waste. The designs, however, are still in the making, as the fabric is not quite strong enough to undergo regular wear and tear.

On a similar note of sustainability, though, actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador Emma Watson recently drew attention for wearing a custom-made Calvin Klein dress fashioned from recycled soda bottles on the red carpet. Time will tell if SCOBY can match the likes of Watson's dress, but if it can, I'm in.  

Must-have fashion books for 9 kinds of people

Must-have fashion books for 9 kinds of people

Kicking off Fashion Month

Kicking off Fashion Month